TGH Aviation Celebrates 60 Year Anniversary

TGH Aviation Celebrates 60 Year Anniversary

Auburn, CA, March 30th, 2017

 

TGH Aviation, one of the most trusted and respected Part 145 Repair Stations in the industry, this year celebrates its 60th anniversary. TGH Aviation takes pride in its humble beginnings and appreciates the loyalty and dedication of both customers and employees throughout the past six decades. The company will commemorate the occasion with a number of customer appreciation specials and anniversary promotions throughout the year.

In 1957 founder Emery “Claude” Oxley Senior set out with a vision to specialize in the repair of gyroscopes for General Aviation aircraft. Claude originally began working out of his home in Riverside, California before his son Emery moved the business to a small wooden building in Auburn, California and joined forces with Chief Engineer, Rich Anderson. The early years were critical to the long term success of The Gyro House, now known as TGH Aviation. The founders built a strong infrastructure for the future by developing the TGH Aviation reputation as a top quality aircraft instrument repair facility with superior customer service.

Over the course of the last 60 years, TGH Aviation has vastly expanded its capabilities beyond gyroscopes, evolving into a diverse aircraft instrument repair facility that has become known world-wide. TGH Aviation now offers over 20,000 service capabilities, including the repair of primary flight instruments, avionics, aural warning systems, fuel flow transmitters, and their related indicators and refueling sensors. Today TGH Aviation is a valued supplier to the United States Department of Defense, NATO and a world-wide network of aviation maintenance facilities and parts brokers while still maintaining its legacy customer base of General Aviation pilots.

TGH Aviation provides outright sales, exchange sales, avionic installations and upgrades, repair services, and holds distributorships for most of the major manufacturers of the aforementioned product lines. The company’s repair shop customer base spans all areas of the industry from general aviation, corporate aviation and commercial aviation. The customer base includes airlines, parts brokers and maintenance facilities on five continents.

The past 60 years have been a hugely successful time for TGH Aviation, which now consists of a fully operational repair station, fuel lab, online pilot supply store and an avionics hangar. A veteran-owned company, TGH Aviation employs forward-thinking, growth-oriented management and all employees work to build the company reputation while improving industry presence and stature. “I am fortunate to be part of the TGH family. Here at TGH Aviation we strive for excellence in all work performed, as well as, our customer relations. I look forward to seeing what the next 60 years bring” states Hilary Coury, Sales & Marketing Manager. The company is delighted to have become a part of the local community and to have had the pleasure of working with and meeting many people over the years and look forward to continuing to build on these strong relationships in the future.

 

As TGH Aviation looks to the next 60 years the mission continues to be to provide customers with high quality products, overhauls and repairs, all delivered with premiere customer service. As one of the most trusted and respected Part 145 Repair Stations in the industry today, TGH Aviation strives to create a great customer experience each and every time.

For a complete list of capabilities, go to www.tghaviation.com for more information.

Frequently Asked Altimeter Questions

Frequently Asked Altimeter Questions

 

The pointers on my altimeter are very jumpy and stick sometimes.
What is wrong?

The altimeter is exposed to the outside atmosphere. This includes all of the dirt and dust present in that atmosphere. Dirt and dust will get into the gears and cause them to stick and bind, the vibration from the aircraft will help the gears to overcome this problem but they will be very jumpy and become worse as the unit gets older. This unit needs an overhaul.

 

Can I convert my milli-bar altimeter to InHg or vice versa?

Yes, altimeter dials can be converted, provided that the manufacturer has published a procedure for doing so. If there are no published, FAA Approved, procedures then, no, this modification cannot be accomplished.

 

How often does my altimeter need to be calibrated?

The FAA requires that the aircraft static system be tested and certified biannually. The altimeter is a part of that system.

 

The altimeter ID plate says that it is a 35,000 Ft. altimeter, but the repair shop that overhauled my altimeter marked the unit as being certified to 30,000 Ft. Why the difference?

As altimeters get older and the parts wear the unit will become inaccurate at the higher end of its range. This does not mean that the altimeter can no longer be used; it just has to be used at the lower altitude. Therefore, it will be sold only to customers who request a lower altitude unit, typically general aviation.

 

What is a “car” altimeter?

Sometimes, if a unit is so old and worn that it can no longer be used in an aircraft then these units are sold at a discounted price for use in other than aircraft, typically people will use them in motor homes, cars, and boats.

 

Along with my altimeter, I received a correction card. What is that?

Altitude is a non-linear function.  It is impossible to calibrate an altimeter to be absolutely accurate at all altitudes. Therefore, a certain amount of error is allowable. The correction card advises the users of the amount of error in a particular altimeter. As each altimeter will have its own characteristics, the error card is identified with the unit’s serial number.

 

What is a TSO?

TSO stands for Technical Standard Order. This is an FAA document, which defines how a specific type of instrument should work in order to be considered airworthy. Altimeters manufactured by the following companies typically are manufactured to TSO standards: United Instruments, Kollsman, Garwin, and Aerosonic. Altimeters manufactured by the following companies typically are not qualified to TSO specifications:UMA & Falcon. If an instrument is certified to a TSO, it must state such on the ID plate. If it does not state the TSO on the nameplate then you must assume that it is not qualified to the TSO.

 

What are the typical failure modes of an altimeter?

  1. Sticky/jumpy pointers
  2. Inability to properly adjust the Kollsman window
  3. Out of calibration
  4. Worn pivots and/or jewels
  5. “Oil-canning” of the aneroid